Reviews


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Man of La Mancha, Theater Latte Da
Through Oct. 22, 2017
Ritz Theater, 345 Thirteenth Ave. NE, Minneapolis

 

 

 

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By John Townsend, Lavender Magazine - October 6, 2017

“As the Don sings and shares his side of the story, the others find their hostility eventually melting away into pure vulnerability. The endearing Sola was born for this role and his vocals, blended with numinous insight about the character’s chivalrous goodness, make for a magnificent performance. His rendition of Dulcinea and the show’s most widely beloved tune, The Impossible Dream, are transcendent.”

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By Bev Wolfe, Twin Cities Arts Reader - September 27, 2017

“Sola and Kreidler as the leads make this show click. Sola has a powerful singing voice and ably portrays a man who is terrified of his fate but persists in going forward on his own terms, and will not cower to bullies.”

By Andy Brower, Bookriot.com - September 25, 2017

“The diverse cast of fifteen did the work of double or triple that number, led by the charismatic and buoyant performance of Martin Sola.”

 

By Arthur Dorman, Talkinbroadway.com September 2017

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“Then there is the cast, a gathering of sublime talent who pour their hearts into this show. Martín Solá, a New York based actor, makes a magnificent local debut as Cervantes and Don Quixote. He delivers every line with utmost conviction, both as the idealist Cervantes, who has seen the brutality of the world, yet still has "never had the courage to believe in nothing," and as Don Quixote, whose strain of madness might make him the sanest of all men in a world gone mad. Solá has a gorgeous voice, delivering a rousing "Man of La Mancha," a tender "Dulcinea," and an inspirational "Impossible Dream" that stops the show.”

 

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By David and Chelsea Berglund, How Was the Show - September 19, 2017

“The actors deliver an impressive range of emotion, all portraying multiple characters. The principals are all strong, but Martin Solá is a revelation as Cervantes, Quijanoa, and Quixote, injecting unique characterization and depth into each persona. His vocals are outstanding as well, providing an electric rendition of the standard “Dream the Impossible Dream.””

 

Cherry and Spoon – September 19, 2017

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“Martín Solá makes his #TCTheater debut, direct from Broadway (he left On Your Feet, the Gloria and Emilio Estefan bio-musical, just last month to do this show), and he's as wonderful a Don Quixote as one could ask for. Noble and sympathetic and slightly crazy, he makes it easy to see why Don Quixote won so many people over to his side. And what a voice!”

 

By Jay Gabler, City Pages - Wednesday, September 20, 2017

“Once the story is underway, though, the production luxuriates in the brilliant music and witty script that have kept playwright Dale Wasserman’s adaptation of Don Quixote in regular rotation for half a century. As author Miguel de Cervantes, Martín Solá sublimely embodies the noble mien that makes the ostensibly disordered Spaniard a magnetic figure.”

 

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By Graydon Royce, Star Tribune - September 19, 2017

“Solá has the requisite charisma, voice and stamina to make Cervantes/Quixote a man who convinces his fellow prisoners that he deserves better than his fate… He is flush with nobility and honor, ...”

 

Peter Rothstien - Director

“It’s a fairly tall order. There’s not a lot of music inside the work, so I knew I wanted actors who could handle the language. And we’re doing it with 11 actors, so I knew they’d be playing multiple roles,” says Rothstein. “I was also looking for diversity in all sorts of ways and I knew I needed smart actors who want to have these conversations but also have strong singing and acting chops.”

Broadway veteran Martin Sola left the Gloria Estefan musical, “On Your Feet,” to make his Latte Da debut as Quixote. Meghan Kreidler, whose musical appearances have included Mu Performing Arts’ “Flower Drum Song,” will play Aldonza/Dulcinea. And the cast boasts Latte Da veterans Sara Ochs (“Sweeney Todd”), Dan Hopman (“Into the Woods”) and Andre Shoals (“Ragtime”).

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What to Expect From the Musical by the Creators of Despicable Me

BY RUTHIE FIERBERG

JUL 31, 2017

Cinco Paul, the composer of Bubble Boy The Musical, shares the old-school musical theatre inspirations and pop influences in this track-by-track breakdown.

REGRET
"It was actually relatively easy song spotting this show, and “Regret” is a great example of this. Slim’s moment in the movie where he tells the story of Wildfire declared itself as a song from the very first outline. The Spanish line “soso y sensato” translates as “bland and sensitive.” We’ve had many Slims throughout the development of the show, but no one has sung this song as passionately as Martin Sola does here. Anything but soso!"


MAN OF LA MANCHA - The Shakespeare Theatre, 2015

 

Charles Shubow - Broadway World

“Martin Sola (The Padre) nails the lovely "To Each His Dulcinea"”

Barbara Mackay - Theatermania

“Fourteen actors play a variety of roles, doubling as prisoners and elements of Quixote's dream…while Martín Solá makes a fine, high-strung Padre…”

Alan Katz - DC Theater Scene 

“While the leads’ singing was high class (not to mention the sweetest song in the show, “To Each His Dulcinea,” beautifully sung by Martín Solá)…”

 

Paul M. Bessel and Barbara Braswell - DC Metro Theater Arts

"Rayanne Gonzales as the housekeeper, Maria Failla as Antonia, and Martin Sola as the Padre are wonderful when they present “I’m Only Thinking of Him.”

 

Barbara Trainin Blank - MD Theater Review

“I very much enjoyed “I’m Only Thinking of Him.” The operatic voices of Martin Sola (The Padre), Maria Failla (as both Quixote’s niece, Antonia, and Fermina, a second kitchen maid who hates Aldonza), and Rayanne Gonzales (the housekeeper and innkeeper’s wife), seem to fit the music.”

Anthony C. Hayes - Baltimore Post-Examiner 

"Martín Solá provides a pleasingly subdued performance as The Padre. Solá is joined by Maria Fallia (Fermina) and Rayanne Gonzalez (Maria) in a nice rendition of “I’m only Thinking of Him.”

Jordan Wright - Whisk and Quill, Alexandria Times

“...Iman, Warlow, Joshi, Martin Sola as The Padre and Robert Mammana as The Duke and Dr. Carrasco are all spectacular ..."

Malcolm Barnes - Communities Digital News

"The Shakespeare Theatre Company is not afraid to showcase new emerging acting and directing talent. That’s amply displayed in this production, as evidenced by their casting of strong Latino actors such as Caesar Barajas as Pedro; Rayanne Gonzales as the nnkeeper’s wife; Robert Mammana as the duke; JP Moraga as the dance captain; James Hayden Rodriguez as Jose; and Martin Sola as the Padre."


OLIVES AND BLOOD – Connecticut Repertory Theater,  2014

Martín as Luís Trescante in Olives and Blood

Martín as Luís Trescante in Olives and Blood

Broadwayworld.com

“The play commences in a shabby flat in Madrid, the home of the aging Fascist, Trescante, played powerfully by Martin Sola.”

 

Bonnie Goldberg - CT. Critics Circle

“The drama stretches back and forth like an elastic band, first capturing the idealistic young poet beautifully delineated by Nicholas Urda, and then snapping sharply to the delusional Truscante, portrayed with a touch of malice and mischief by Martin Sola.”

Bessy Reina - Identidád Latina

“Otro actor que vale la pena reconocer, por su interpretación, es Martín Sola, en el papel del asesino Troscante. Sola, nos presenta un hombre que vive en la miseria para quien el ser llamado como testigo del asesinato de Lorca, le permitirá sentirse una vez mas como un “héroe”.”

“Another actor worth recognizing, for his interpretation, is Martín Solá, in the role of the assassin Trescante. Solá presents us with a man living in misery, who is called as a witness in the hearings over the murder of Lorca. This allows him to feel, for one last time, like a “hero”.”

 


THE MOST HAPPY FELLA - THE GOODSPEED OPERA HOUSE, 2013

Abbondanza!

Sylviane Gold - The New York Times

"Martín Solá, Greg Roderick and Daniel Berryman blend their sweet voices in Loesser’s gorgeous tribute to earthly pleasures, “Abbondanza.” 

 

Frank Rizzo - The Hartford Courant

"There's also a comic Puccini touch with a trio of singers (Martín Solá, Greg Roderick, Daniel Berryman) letting loose with "Abbondanza" … what is most memorable are the smaller musical moments: when that same comic trio welcomes a shaken Rosabella with the exquisite "Benvenuta,"…"

 

Kristina Dorsey - The Day

Benvenuta

"You want yet more amazing singing? No problem. The harmonies of Daniel Berryman, Martín Solá and Greg Roderick, who play a trio of chefs, meld together into a single, shimmery gem. Their "Abbondanza" and "Benvenuta" are highlights of the production."

 

Mark G. Auerbach - The Westfield News

"A trio of chefs, Martin Sola, Greg Roderick, and Daniel Berryman perform the difficult “Abbodanza” with high spirits."

Zander Opper - Talkin' Broadway

"...and the trio of Greg Roderick, Daniel Berryman, and Martin Sola, as Italian chefs, are pretty fabulous in the numbers "Sposalizio" and the aforementioned "Abbondanza.""

The Most Happy Fella

Walt Haggerty - In the Spotlight

"Martin Sola, Greg Roderick, and Daniel Berryman each contribute an authentic Italian flavor to the performance in a series of numbers."

 

Julie Stern - The Newtown Bee

"Gregory Roderick, Martin Sola and Daniel Berryman as a trio of Italian chefs provide some energetic comic relief that makes you wish they’d come to your house."


EVITA - THEATER BY THE SEA, 2008

Martín as Che in Evita

Martín as Che in Evita

Channing Gray - The Providence RI Journal

"There were other singers who were marvelous, though. Martin Sola, the evening's Che, could do no wrong. Sola, who serves as the narrator for the show and at times Evita's conscience, made a dashing figure with a glorious voice. His credits list productions with New York City Opera, and it showed."

 

 

Bill Gale - RNI Radio, RI

"Sola's Che, the narrator/provocateur in "Evita" is nothing less than a well-shaped power trip. His voice is resonant, filled with emotion and his vibrant physicality makes him memeorable." 

Dan Trafford - The Call & The Times RI

"Martin Sola is perfect as Che, the complex narrator who incorporates a historical perspective with the viewpoint of Argentina's oppressed. His voice is impressive and his stage presence commanding. He adopts various personas depending on the plot and the song, but by the end of the play he's rocking a Latin revolutionary look that's reminiscent of another Che, Che Guevara." 

Tony Annicone - Theater Mirror, RI

"One of the best Che's around is Martin Sola. The character is the narrator and moves in and out of scenes while commenting on her behavior. Martin's magnificent tenor voice soars in his many numbers including the gorgeous, "High Flying Adored" to the raucous "Oh What A Circus" and "The Money Kept Rolling In" with the chorus." 

Chris Verleger - The Edge

"As Ché, Sola carries the show brilliantly. His voice and expressions exemplify angst and disenchantment, yet evoke sympathy and caution." 

Doug Hadden - All Pawtucket all the time, RI

"But it was Martin Sola as Che Guevara (the Argentine-born revolutionary), functioning as the hard-working narrator for the play while giving it a clear-eyed social conscience, whose singing most won over the audience, and rightfully so."


ALL EYES AND EARS – INTAR, 2008

Richard Hinojosa - nytheatre.com 

"Terumi Matthews leads a great cast as the strong and determined Carmen. She does a stellar job showing us all her strengths and weaknesses while remaining endearing. Martín Solá plays her husband Emilio with very clear yearning and disillusionment."

 

 


THE TRAGEDY OF CARMEN - THE TWO RIVER THEATER, 2007

The New York Times 

"Martín Solá as Escamillo mimes the traditional bullfighter moves with a degree of authenticity and his Toreador Song pulses with Latin fervor."


The King and I – National Tour, 2005

Talkin' Broadway Regional Theater News and Reviews
Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera

"Martín Solá, as Lun Tha, sings beautifully and powerfully with Lor in their showcase duet of "I Have Dreamed."

THE COLUMN Theatre Awards

Dallas Summer Musicals

"Martín Solá and Luz Lor are resplendent as the lovers "Lun Tha" and "Tuptim". Solá is a tall, masculine, handsome man with a soloflex body that had the ladies in the audience swoon. The actor also has a soaring, crystal clean tenor voice that is fully supported by a booming belt. His vibrato coats this sublime singing voice like soft linen. Solá's stage presence is extremely strong, which adds yet more enjoyment to watch him on stage. "


The King and I - Sacramento Music Circus

The Sacramento Bee

"Solá's magnificent voice and presence are shown to great advantage in his duets with Iwama in "we kiss in the shadow" and I have a dream."

Recordnet.com

"Music Circus dropped wisely its big-budget name-recognition stars, its hired less famous people, but often with bigger talents. As the young doomed lovers who "Kiss in the Shadow", soprano Yumi Iwama and tenor Martín Solá are such performers. Beautiful to look at, they would also grace an opera stage."


AMOR Y DESENGAÑO - SOLO ALBUM, 2001

San Francisco Examiner

The critically acclaimed album by Vocalist Martín Solá featuring Guitarist Oren Fader.   “…A self-produced album of despairing Puerto Rican love songs of the ‘40’s…the New York-based Singer’s sexy sincerity and smoldering good looks cannot be denied…” 


The King and IIndianapolis - Beef and Boards

 

The Herald Bulletin

"Other shining stars include Martín Solá who is bringing his experience to the stage in the role of Lun Tha which he performed several times with the Broadway cast, and his love interest Tuptim, is beautifully played by Michelle Liu Coughlin. Their passion is intense."

Indianapolis Star

"The performances of Michelle Liu Coughlin and Martín Solá, as Tuptim and Lun Tha, the Burmese slave girl and her Burmese lover, are intense and passionate."